Genesis of Revelation

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This topic contains 8 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by Profile photo of Darante Martin Anonymous 1 year, 4 months ago.

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  • #2411
    Profile photo of Darante Martin
    Anonymous

    Every living thing has a genesis, and that genesis is ultimately all about perspective. So what does that initial moment of the genesis of revolution look like. Not necessarily the conception of revolution, which in many cases can never be traced, but the actual birth of it. I’ve imagined possibilities. Dream with me for a moment.

    Fables of The Revolution: Genesis Prime

    It all started with one community, a colony of our own, if you will. We called it Genesis. A solitary stretch of real estate encompassing approximately 500 acres of land, water, wildlife, abandoned buildings and trees. The idea was a radical one, INDEPENDENCE. And that idea of independence meant freedom, and freedom required an exodus. On these 500 acres of land, our people would truly be free and would openly accept and embrace the challenge of charting a new course to life.

    The early years should have been the hardest, but they were eerily the easiest days of our lives. Just imagine, all of us packing up our lives and relocating to what felt like a remote island surrounded by acres and acres of trees and nothingness. You really had to be looking for this place to find it, and that was kind of the goal back then. True independence meant living outside of the realm of regulation. And our deed to this real estate, gave us the authority and right to regulate ourselves within our property.

    People still ask, how did we live? Easy, simply. We learned to farm and we learned to build. We ate what we grew and we lived in what we could build or restore. Life became easy, because we were no longer trying to compete. We watched abandoned houses become homes. The founders of our community organized us in such a way where no man worked a job yet every man provided for his community. And in return, the community provided for its residents. People who had a passion for agriculture faithfully tended our farms and taught others in the community how to do the same. Residents who exhibited skill and mastery in construction and engineering committed themselves to ensure that every resident had a home and that every resident had taken some part in the construction or renovation of his home in order to pass on those necessary life skills of building.

    In the beginning, we were all homeschoolers. There were no jobs, there were no bills. There was only life and community. No one had to choose between a good parent or being a good provider. Our community transformed us from homeschooling to creating a community school system. While no one was stuck in the system anymore, it was easier for people to find their passions and get to work. Many became the educators of our community and created programs that rival any european form of education. We were free. Unrestricted, Unlimited. If we wanted to do something now, we just did it.

    Imagine our children, gathered on a Monday afternoon in the community square being taught by community educators whom they see everyday. Being taught not just from textbooks, but from nature itself, from life itself. Our community had given us such privilege with our simplicity. We would often invite great pan-african educators to spend “mission weeks” lecturing our students on important subjects.

    The farmers of our community negotiated contracts with outside grocers to purchase their produce directly from us. The builders of our community, built subdivisions outside of our community in impoverished black neighborhoods and rented out those properties well below market value. The artists of our community gave us entertainment and inspiration. Live plays, performances, poetic pieces, variety skits. Whatever could be imagined, our artist could create. There was never a dull moment. We created our own marketing platforms and as a community supported our artist by selling their products to the masses.

    Before we knew it, we were actually able to pay residents for living in our community. As long as each resident could commit his gifts to the advancement of his community, there existed no bills. There was no capitalism among us, just trade. But our community was provided for by the greed of capitalism. People want better prices, and our community was able to provide that because we were no longer the worker bees. We were the producers. Masters of our own destiny. Comfortable within in our own skin.

    Within 5 years we had established a total of 21 Genesis communities. Each community with its own tribunal leadership, its own laws and law enforcement. After a while we had stopped selling to the outside world and began trading with each other exclusively and other pan-african nations and black communities throughout the world, including Canada and Mexico. Our communities had helped to restabilize Haiti’s independence and had allowed our communities to establish a strong partnership with the black continent. The provisional governmental leaders of our developing nation found sanctuary in our communities and could move freely through each community without outside technicians. Our educators and our strategist had created a community language to be used when communicating official national directives, one that could not be easily decoded by european threats. By banding together in simplicity, we had done more for the revolution than we could have ever imagined. There was nothing that we could imagine, that we could not accomplish. White supremacy did not exist in our communities, so it did not exist within our nation.  Divided we came, united we conquered. Before the world knew it, we were back in control.

     

    I know a fictional parallel is often a longer route to get to a predescribed point, but I hope that the imagery helps to make the idea more realistic, more pliable and hopefully makes it easier for us to dialogue about the realities of revolution. Instead of just asking a question, or making a statement; build your question or statement into the story and imagine the outcome. That’s how plans are made, that’s how wars are won before they are even begun.

     

  • #2415
    Profile photo of Asad Malik
    Asad Malik
    Keymaster

    This is beautiful. I am truly thankful that you have joined us on this walk. Allegories can oftentimes help our people internalize the vision and change their beliefs to make it happen!

    Here is my thing: Why do we believe that we must revert to farming and living in hand made structures? I am of the belief that we can harness the power of technology, engineering, hydroponics, and renewable energies to build the cities of the future rather than cities archetypal of the past.

    This is a solar powered vertical farm that is self sustaining

    This home was built with cheap material by hand and is completely self sustaining using solar power and the movement of water around the compound that generates electricity

    Our future should look better than our past.

  • #2490
    Profile photo of Darante Martin
    Anonymous

    That’s exactly the vision! To create something often thought not possible. I would love to explore the sustainable options, especially the housing above, and their turn key implementation. I think those are some great and ATTRACTIVE options! Great perspective!

  • #2941
    Profile photo of J. A. Haley
    Anonymous

    I love this!!! Thank you for sharing this Darante. Growing our own food  will need to become the norm for African people. Assad you are right, agriculture has come a long way with technology. Once an agricultural ecosystem is set up correctly it can pretty much sustain itself. It’s funny because I just went to a aquaponics workshop earlier this week and I learned that lettuces grown using the aquaponics method often have a longer shelf life because of the nutrient density. We are talking weeks instead of days.

    Genesis communities also seems to be focused on communal living. Communal lifestyles are becoming more and more popular with the price of land and housing climbing so this idea is not impractical or far fetched at all.  It’s already being done. We just need to take it to the next level. I do not believe that the traditional Eurocentric community planning model should be duplicated in anyway in African communities as it’s too focused on capitalistic and imperialistic objectives. I love the Genesis concept because I honestly believe this is what will save us. Dr. Marimba Ani made it clear that liberation begins with freeing our minds of European concepts. This approach is a return to the traditional African ways. Thanks again for sharing!

  • #2943
    Profile photo of Darante Martin
    Anonymous

    Thank you Jiwaun! We need more eyes and ears on this plan because we’re going to need a lot of hands and hearts to make it possible. I would love to explore more about aquaphonics! There are so many ideas and possibilities if we could ever get in a room together to start strategically developing these duplicable communities focused on revolution and renaissance. And to get started may not be as expensive as we think. We just need to intentionally start thinking in that direction. Check out this town for sale in Georgia. http://www.toomsboroforsale.com

  • #2964
    Profile photo of J. A. Haley
    Anonymous

    I read somewhere that the asking price for Toomsboro was $2.3 million. I haven’t been able to verify that…but I think that Toomsboro (and towns like it) is a good initial first step. Toomsboro has a population of 472 people and just under half of the population is Black which is a plus!

  • #2982
    Profile photo of Darante Martin
    Anonymous

    It’s been going up and down quite a bit, but the last I heard is that the owners would take $800K to walk away lol.

  • #2986
    Profile photo of Asad Malik
    Asad Malik
    Keymaster

    But with that amount of money, why wouldnt we just build our own cities?

  • #2989
    Profile photo of Darante Martin
    Anonymous

    Both routes would ultimately require the same things. If we build we’d still have to buy, and if we buy we’d still have to build. The only major advantage to buying is immediate functionality from day one. That’s attractive. For less than a million, we could potentially own assets worth well into the billions by centralizing a location where our councils can live out their purpose and mission. Our organization possessess the capacity to add value to an area like that by repurposing the town under our own economic uses.

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